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2018 Mac Mini [8th,6C,B] + RX Vega [email protected] (Sonnet Breakaway 350) + macOS...
 

2018 Mac Mini [8th,6C,B] + RX Vega [email protected] (Sonnet Breakaway 350) + macOS 10.14.1 & Win10 1803 [adamk77]  

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adamk77
(@adamk77)
Eminent Member
Joined: 4 months ago
 

This was an odd experience for me. The problems I encountered were not the usual issues that I read about on the forum. When I was finally up and running, it has been smooth sailing, which took me my surprise. I am able to reboot from Mac to Windows and vice versa without having to unplug anything, and it all just works, which I did not expect.

System Specs
Late 2018 Mac Mini / 8th-generation 6-core i7 / UHD 630 iGPU / 32GB RAM / 512GB SSD / 10 Gigabit Ethernet

I also have a dual monitor setup. I think having 2 screens will make this easier. The 1st screen is connected to the eGPU and the 2nd screen is connected to the Mac Mini (iGPU).

  • LG 43" 43UD70-B 4K display connected to the eGPU via DisplayPort.
  • ASUS ZenScreen MB16AC 15.6" 1080p portable display connected to the Mac Mini (iGPU) via USB 3.1 (also powered by it).

eGPU Hardware
Sonnet eGFX Breakaway Box 350W / included 0.5m 40Gb Thunderbolt 3 cable / Sapphire Vega 56 Pulse / 1TB Samsung X5

Hardware pictures

IMG 6970
IMG 6969
IMG 6968

Installation Steps
MacOS:

Nothing to report here. It was plug-and-play. None of the cables I initially tried worked -- neither the DisplayPort-to-USB-C nor the DisplayPort-to-DisplayPort cables worked. I then tried the HDMI cable and it worked, making me wondering if my GPU was defective. I tried another DisplayPort-to-DisplayPort cable (this one is thicker and came with my monitor), and this worked.

It was an amateur mistake and lesson learned. Make certain that you are using the right cable, or you will waste a lot of time. 

Windows:
Windows 10 was problematic and a windy road. I tried using the automate-eGPU EFI, but it would not detect the eGPU ("Detected eGPU" on the boot screen was empty), so I gave up on it. Strangely, I could not even boot Windows into Safe Mode as my Mac Mini would simply shut off trying to boot into it. So I did not even run DDU in Safe Mode. The below is what eventually worked for me.  

Prerequisites:

  • Install Windows 10 (I installed 1803, which is the April update) via Bootcamp. Just make your life simple and install it on a partition on the internal SSD. I originally planned on installing it on an external Thunderbolt 3 SSD but decided against it. I wanted to eliminate as many complications as possible. 
  • Make sure you can boot into Windows without the eGPU and download the GPU driver.

Steps:

  1. Disconnect the eGPU from the Mac Mini.
  2. Connect the ASUS portable display to the Mac Mini.
  3. Reboot and press-and-hold the "alt" key to display the boot options (I found my bluetooth Apple keyboard unreliable, so I used another USB Keyboard).
  4. Boot into Windows.
  5. Connect eGPU to the Mac Mini. The main monitor should also be connected to the eGPU. Use the Thunderbolt 3 port closest to the HDMI port.
  6. Install the GPU driver.
  7. At this point, I saw the "error 12" in device manager for my GPU. So I disabled "PCIe Root Port #2 - A339" in device manager, then rebooted back into Windows.
  8. This time, my main LG 4K monitor that was connected to the eGPU was showing the login screen, meaning that the eGPU was detected. Except, none of my keyboards were working!
  9. All I could do was to force a shutdown by holding onto the power button on the Mac Mini.
  10. I disconnected the eGPU from the Mac Mini and booted back into Windows.
  11. I re-enabled "PCIe Root Port #2 - A339" in device manager.
  12. I shut down Windows.
  13. I reconnected the eGPU to the Mac Mini and booted back into Windows. I was planning on disabling the PCIe controller for the 10 Gigabit Ethernet in case of the "error 12" issue, but...
  14. Everything was magically working. The main monitor was showing the login screen and my keyboard was functional.

I was afraid this was a fluke. I tried booting from MacOS to Windows and from Windows to MacOS many times, expecting something to go awry. However, it is working every single time. 

I read a build guide where it said that booting to Windows fails if the eGPU is connected, but I do not have this issue. I also read that the poster had to disconnect the NVMe SSD before booting to Windows, but I do not have this issue either.

I was also afraid that I would have to disable the 2nd Thunderbolt controller, which means I would not be able to use my Samsung X5. However, this also was not the case.

For some odd reason, everything just works. 

Benchmarks
I do not yet have any games installed, so I just ran the Unigine Heaven benchmark in MacOS.

Screen Shot 2019 04 10 at 4.45.36 PM
Screen Shot 2019 04 10 at 4.54.59 PM

Comments
I actually had my heart set on the Razer Core X because it seemed like the best bang for the money. However, I could not find it anywhere in stock. I needed an eGPU as quickly as possible for work, so I purchased the cheapest Sonnet 350w version thinking that it would be plenty for the Vega 56.

On Sonnet's compatibility page, they state that the 350W version does not support the Vega 56 and steer customers toward the more expensive 550W version. This is odd because Sonnet lists that the 350W version can support up to 300W GPU, and the Vega 56 is rated at below 200W.

The Vega 56 requires 2x 8-pin PCIe power connectors. The Sonnet 350W comes with 2x PCIe power connectors as described below: 

  1. One 6+2 pin PCIe connector.
  2. One 6 pin PCIe connector.

I plugged the 6+2 pin PCIe connector into one of the 8-pin slots on the Vega 56, and purchased a 6-pin-to-8-pin adapter on Amazon for $7.  I am not sure if the adapter is even necessary, but I wanted to be safe and it seems to work.

Interestingly, for use with the Mac Mini, I find the 350W more upgradeable than the 550W version, because the 550W version reserves more watts (85W vs 15W) for power delivery for charging laptops and such, siphoning those watts away from potentially powering the GPU. I have no need for it because I will not be charging anything with it and would be happier if everything went to the GPU.

Finally, I have been running with the eGPU with the cover off of the Sonnet enclosure, and I was surprised that the fans on the GPU were not spinning at all. It seems that they only spin up at some threshold temperature. All this time, I was under the impression that the fans were spinning at all times, slower or faster depending on the temperature, but always. But this is not the case.

All this makes for an extremely quiet setup. The enclosure itself is very quiet, too, so I cannot even tell if it is on.

I am very happy with the final outcome. The frame rates are great, and Xcode seems to take full advantage of the GPU. I am even happier because the Sonnet 350W was only $200 as opposed to the Razer Core X's $300 and Sonnet 550W's $290 price tag.  If needed, the PSU can also be upgraded.

I just wish I knew exactly why I am not experiencing many of the issues that other members have been experiencing, so that I can actually call this a build "guide."

Edit 2019.4.14
:
I'm not 100% sure if this is because of the PSU, but when I run a demanding game, my screen sometimes gets momentarily very dim like someone turned down the brightness way down.

It only happens in demanding games, when the fans on the GPU and the enclosure have kicked into high gear.

I think things are better when I set the GPU into a “power saving profile” inside AMD’s Wattman. I have not seen the screen dimming after I did this, but I need to test more to be sure.

My Mac Mini and the enclosure are both connected to a UPS that shows me how much power is being drawn. At idle in Windows, it’s around 80-100W. When in a game, I’ve seen it spike to 475W. It doesn’t stay there, but the fact that it spikes so high is a little too close for comfort given the relatively weak PSU of the enclosure. Though I'm sure that it's not all due to the GPU.

So I just decided to upgrade the PSU to the 650W. I was going to do it anyway in the future because I planned on flashing the Vega 56 with the Vega 64 firmware, which would definitely have made the stock PSU inadequate.

 

This topic was modified 3 months ago

 2018 Mac Mini i7, 32GB RAM, 512GB SSD, 10Gbit ethernet
Sonnet eGFX Breakaway Box 350W with Sapphire Vega 56 Pulse


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OliverB
(@oliverb)
Noble Member
Joined: 9 months ago
 

@adamk77, nice build and description.

It is not absolutely necessary to disable a Thunderbolt 3-Port. That would be really bad if it was.
I told you so ;p... i

Posted by: adamk77

.......

  1. I reconnected the eGPU to the Mac Mini and booted back into Windows. I was planning on disabling the PCIe controller for the 10 Gigabit Ethernet in case of the "error 12" issue, but...
  2. Everything was magically working. The main monitor was showing the login screen and my keyboard was functional.

@adamk77, there is no magic involved. I told you before, that booting with eGPU plugged in prevents Error 12. This is an important message for everyone to try this before disabling ports or using other invasive hacks. See also Bootcamp Guide without hacks.

 

I read a build guide where it said that booting to Windows fails if the eGPU is connected, but I do not have this issue. I also read that the poster had to disconnect the NVMe SSD before booting to Windows, but I do not have this issue either.

Actually this is/was hard for me to believe. On my systems (two completely different macbooks) I don't have this issue either. But I was told that on some Macs the iGPU is switched off when booting with an eGPU plugged in. Never on my systems. Does this happen to your system? This would be very interesting to know. 
@eightarmedpet this could be interesting for you, too.

 

I was also afraid that I would have to disable the 2nd Thunderbolt controller, which means I would not be able to use my Samsung X5. However, this also was not the case.

For some odd reason, everything just works. 

There is nothing odd about it 🙂 Your system behaves exactly the same as every mac I was using/testing eGPUs. Why exactly would yo call it "odd"?

 

I just wish I knew exactly why I am not experiencing many of the issues that other members have been experiencing, so that I can actually call this a build "guide."

This is exactly the same question I am asking myself since I had my first eGPU. I get different kind of issues, but those are hardly addressed. All those issues addressed in this site never occurred to me. It may be luck with my setups or an improvement of the system (I really thing Windows 10 has evolved a lot).

Error 12, which appears like a great monster here, has never been a problem to me. Neither gets the iGPU disabled or there was any need to disable any ports or camera or boot into Windows with a bootloader.

What is really strange that some builds do have exactly the same hardware like me and they are doing all kind of invasive things, about which I am very sure that they are not necessary. Sometimes I wonder, if they even tried before without those hacks/tricks. If people blindly follow other guides the unnecessary steps are transported from one build to another, even though they are obsolete since long ago.

This post was modified 3 months ago

2018 15" MBP & 2015 13" MBP connected to RTX2080Ti GTX1080Ti GTX1080 Vega56 RX580 R9-290 GTX680


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Eightarmedpet
(@eightarmedpet)
Noble Member
Joined: 2 years ago
 

@Oliverb on both my Mac Mini and my 2017 MBP 13inch the iGPU is disabled when an eGPU is connected at boot.

Just because you haven't experienced error 12 doesn't mean it doesn't exist, I had issues for over a year. 

I also had boot issues when I booted the Mini with both eGPU and 5K Ultrafine.

Just because you don't have these issues doesn't mean they don't exist, c'mon man.. you're a smart guy, you should know this...

2017 13" MacBook Pro Touch Bar
GTX1060 + AKiTiO Thunder3 + Win10
GTX1070 + Sonnet Breakaway Box + Win10
GTX1070 + Razer Core V1 + Win10
Vega 56 + Razer Core V1 + macOS + Win10
Vega 56 + Mantiz Venus + macOS + W10

---

LG 5K Ultrafine flickering issue fix


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OliverB
(@oliverb)
Noble Member
Joined: 9 months ago
 

@eightarmedpet, I don't say that issues don't exist. I also get Error 12 when I hotplug an AMD eGPU. I only say that a lot of build guides are way too complicated, more complicated that they should be and this confuses people. Ask @adamk77 about it! He also was very confused (his own words) and thought his Thunderbolt 3 Ports needed to be disabled which is just wrong.

Read his posts! He is a smart guy but still is surprised that things work completely different than they are supposed to be if we believed everything that is said here about "needed" and "necessary". It's not.

About the disabling of iGPU, I asked @adamk77  for his experience in this matter. I am very curious what he is saying.

This post was modified 3 months ago

2018 15" MBP & 2015 13" MBP connected to RTX2080Ti GTX1080Ti GTX1080 Vega56 RX580 R9-290 GTX680


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Eightarmedpet
(@eightarmedpet)
Noble Member
Joined: 2 years ago
 

@oliver fair does, can't argue with what you're saying there... but some of the confusion comes from users following the wrong guides.

I too had no luck with the EFI Bootloader with my Mini but its the only thing that works for my MBP, go figure!

I'm getting tempted to buy another Mini and see if I can gt it working in a different way (I wonder if hot plugging my monitor will do the trick).

Love this build btw @adamk77!

This post was modified 3 months ago

2017 13" MacBook Pro Touch Bar
GTX1060 + AKiTiO Thunder3 + Win10
GTX1070 + Sonnet Breakaway Box + Win10
GTX1070 + Razer Core V1 + Win10
Vega 56 + Razer Core V1 + macOS + Win10
Vega 56 + Mantiz Venus + macOS + W10

---

LG 5K Ultrafine flickering issue fix


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itsage
(@itsage)
Famed Member Admin
Joined: 3 years ago
 

I can tell you why @adamk77 was able to get his eGPU setup going in Boot Camp with relative ease. He did his homework. Sure when you never done something before there's a tendency to over analyze things and confuse yourself at times. The positive aspect is he read through different scenarios and prepared himself for the worst.

Many people encountered issues because they didn't take the time to read through others' experience. They then try solutions that may or may not be applicable to their particular setup. I would compare setting up an eGPU in Boot Camp to learning a manual car. You can read and understand the fundamentals of manual transmission. However each clutch has its unique engagement point and finer characteristics that you can only learn when directly interact with it. Similarly each Mac behaves a certain way in Boot Camp when an eGPU is connected. 

It also helps to always have a boot screen display. @adamk77's setup is similar to mine using the ASUS portable USB-C monitor directly connected to the Mac mini's USB-C port. The way he currently boots into Windows disables the iGPU so there's no output to this ASUS monitor once the eGPU kicks in. That doesn't matter because he has another monitor off the eGPU. Boot loader solutions such as automate-eGPU EFI and rEFInd are available for those who want to keep the iGPU activated.

Last but not least, PCIe root port disablement to resolve error 12 is not invasive. It's the very thing Windows suggests to do when there's error 12 seen in Device Manager. They can be re-enabled as soon as Windows loads and the eGPU becomes functional. I find Apple implementing firmware that deactivates the iGPU when there's dGPU or eGPU present more invasive than the EFI solutions which keep the iGPU activated in Boot Camp.

Best ultrabooks for eGPU use

eGPU enclosure buying guide

109 external GPU build guides


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OliverB
(@oliverb)
Noble Member
Joined: 9 months ago
 

@itsage I am not sure if I find this situation ideal.

@adamk77 is very smart guy, yet he writes several times about "miracle", "odd", and he didn't understand why it works, and he was sure he had to disable this and that etc.. He explicitely said he was "confused". Quote:

"I'm confused about your statement of not having to disable any PCIe roots if you use automate-eGPU EFI." 
Link to post.

He is not the only one being confused. With all due respect:, in my opinion this is definitely not good. 

This post was modified 3 months ago

2018 15" MBP & 2015 13" MBP connected to RTX2080Ti GTX1080Ti GTX1080 Vega56 RX580 R9-290 GTX680


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Eightarmedpet
(@eightarmedpet)
Noble Member
Joined: 2 years ago
 

@Oliverb you are being a bit harsh, you've made some great contributions but this constant berating of the mods isn't really on is it?

You could always buy and build and moderate wwww.oliverb-proves-bootcamp-setup-is-easy-on-two-macbooks.com? 😉

2017 13" MacBook Pro Touch Bar
GTX1060 + AKiTiO Thunder3 + Win10
GTX1070 + Sonnet Breakaway Box + Win10
GTX1070 + Razer Core V1 + Win10
Vega 56 + Razer Core V1 + macOS + Win10
Vega 56 + Mantiz Venus + macOS + W10

---

LG 5K Ultrafine flickering issue fix


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OliverB
(@oliverb)
Noble Member
Joined: 9 months ago
 

@eightarmedpit
Hehe it will be www.oliverb-proves-bootcamp-setup-is-easy-on-two-macbooks-amd-adamsk77-mac-mini.com

No, no, I am not berating anyone, nobody must take such discussions personal.  It's only a different opinion and I am defending mine with the same passion I do have for eGPUs.

2018 15" MBP & 2015 13" MBP connected to RTX2080Ti GTX1080Ti GTX1080 Vega56 RX580 R9-290 GTX680


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adamk77
(@adamk77)
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Joined: 4 months ago
 

@oliverb The iGPU is not switched off when I boot with the eGPU plugged in. By the time I see the Window's login screen though (eGPU has kicked in), the 2nd monitor that is plugged into my Mac Mini stops getting any signal.

@eightarmedpet I appreciate that!  I hesitated on calling this a "guide" because it mostly felt like me documenting the haphazard steps I took to get this working. Btw, have you ever tried the Mac Mini & eGPU setup with a non-5K monitor before you returned it?

@itsage I definitely agree with you that having read over the guides definitely helped me. When I saw "error 12", I  knew immediately what it meant and that there were actions that I could take to potentially resolve it. On the other hand, a part of me thinks I over prepared 🙂  The very first thing I tried was disabling SIP and using the automate e-GPU EFI. In retrospect, I think I should have gone from simple --> complex. I think if I tried again from scratch, I could come up with a shorter number of steps. But at the moment, I don't want to mess with what's already working.

I was finally able to get a game up and running. I ran Division 2 in 2K resolution in Ultra, and I was getting 50-60 FPS.  I'm more than happy with this.

 2018 Mac Mini i7, 32GB RAM, 512GB SSD, 10Gbit ethernet
Sonnet eGFX Breakaway Box 350W with Sapphire Vega 56 Pulse


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mac_editor
(@mac_editor)
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Joined: 2 years ago
 
Posted by: adamk77

The iGPU is not switched off when I boot with the eGPU plugged in. By the time I see the Window's login screen though (eGPU has kicked in), the 2nd monitor that is plugged into my Mac Mini stops getting any signal.

@adamk77 is the iGPU visible in the Device Manager when you are booted up like this? The second directly-plugged in monitor stopping is typically a telltale sign that the iGPU was disabled.

purge-wrangler.shpurge-nvda.shset-eGPU.shautomate-eGPU EFI Installer
----
Troubleshooting eGPUs on macOS
Command Line Swiss Knife

Multiple Build Guides
----
Current: MacBook Pro RP560X + 480/R9 Fury/Vega 64 | GTX 780/1070
Previous: 2014 MacBook Pro 750M + 480/R9 Fury | GTX 780/980 Ti/1070


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OliverB
(@oliverb)
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Joined: 9 months ago
 
Posted by: adamk77

@oliverb The iGPU is not switched off when I boot with the eGPU plugged in. 

@adamk77 Thank you for this information. Until lately I even didn't know that some iGPUs may switch off, even after months of extensive eGPU use, I didn't know. It still doesn't make any sense to me.

...On the other hand, a part of me thinks I over prepared 🙂  The very first thing I tried was disabling SIP and using the automate e-GPU EFI. In retrospect, I think I should have gone from simple --> complex. 

I started with the simple way: I borrowed a Blackmagic eGPU from a collegue (who didn't dare to use it on Bootcamp because he read here before). Then I made these steps:

1) I plugged it in. Wait a little. Internal screen went black.
2) Ok, hmm, let's reboot => it worked!
It was soo easy.

I think if I tried again from scratch, I could come up with a shorter number of steps. But at the moment, I don't want to mess with what's already working.

I had exactly the same thinking. I was so surprised that things went so easy that I thought I must be very lucky and better not to touch the system for a long time, because next time it shouldn't be that easy. This was under the false impression that it was very complex and difficult to setup eGPUs in Bootcamp.
Actually this is not the case, you can easily repeat the setup and it will work again. Meanwhile I installed it dozens of times for different setups. It was always very easy.
(...with a very few exceptions like nVidia on MacOSX. This is really a pain in the butt 🙂

This post was modified 3 months ago

2018 15" MBP & 2015 13" MBP connected to RTX2080Ti GTX1080Ti GTX1080 Vega56 RX580 R9-290 GTX680


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goalque
(@goalque)
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Joined: 3 years ago
 
Posted by: mac_editor
Posted by: adamk77

The iGPU is not switched off when I boot with the eGPU plugged in. By the time I see the Window's login screen though (eGPU has kicked in), the 2nd monitor that is plugged into my Mac Mini stops getting any signal.

@adamk77 is the iGPU visible in the Device Manager when you are booted up like this? The second directly-plugged in monitor stopping is typically a telltale sign that the iGPU was disabled.

Yes, can be confirmed only by looking at Device manager. If I don't use apple_set_os.efi, the internal display of my 2018 13" will always get stuck at Windows EFI logo, no spinning wheel. The iGPU disappears from the device manager.

Even though I can use this MBP in closed clamshell mode without hacks with a Radeon VII, the downside is that the internal display gets warm (freezed in EFI environment) and I cannot use "extend these displays" or "show only on 1 or 2", the latter disabling the internal display properly if I want so.

automate-eGPU EFIapple_set_os.efi
--
2018 13" MacBook Pro + Radeon [email protected] + Win10 1809


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adamk77
(@adamk77)
Eminent Member
Joined: 4 months ago
 

@mac_editor No, it's not visible.

@goalque That's interesting. Are you saying that the internal display gets warm because it's in clamshell mode, or because the internal GPU is overheating?

 2018 Mac Mini i7, 32GB RAM, 512GB SSD, 10Gbit ethernet
Sonnet eGFX Breakaway Box 350W with Sapphire Vega 56 Pulse


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mac_editor
(@mac_editor)
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Joined: 2 years ago
 
Posted by: adamk77

@mac_editor No, it's not visible.

Which means iGPU was disabled as expected. Thanks for checking.

purge-wrangler.shpurge-nvda.shset-eGPU.shautomate-eGPU EFI Installer
----
Troubleshooting eGPUs on macOS
Command Line Swiss Knife

Multiple Build Guides
----
Current: MacBook Pro RP560X + 480/R9 Fury/Vega 64 | GTX 780/1070
Previous: 2014 MacBook Pro 750M + 480/R9 Fury | GTX 780/980 Ti/1070


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adamk77
(@adamk77)
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I wanted to see if I could just use a single monitor, connected to both the iGPU and the eGPU.  I had it connected like below:

Main Monitor (DisplayPort) <--> eGPU <--> Mac Mini
Main Monitor (HDMI) <--> Mac Mini

With the input initially set to HDMI (iGPU), I could see the boot screen as expected. After I boot into Windows, the screen flickers. When I attempt to change the input on my monitor to DisplayPort, it won't respond to my input. My monitor comes with a remote, and you can hear me (in the video) clicking the remote to try to change the input to no avail.  I've managed to switch the input once, and once I was able to, it did show me the proper eGPU driven screen.

What's strange is that I've seen two behaviors. The first is the multi-colored screen flicker, and then the screen going blank. The second is the screen flickering like in the video, but it's frozen with the blue Windows logo in the middle of the screen as if the iGPU hasn't been disabled. However, I never see this behavior with the 2 monitor setup.

Another interesting observation which was probably already discussed somewhere, but I missed it. If I boot to the boot screen with the 2nd monitor connected to the Mac Mini's iGPU, and then disconnect the cable from my 2nd display and reconnect it, the 2nd monitor never receives the signal again. So it seems the 2nd display cannot be hot plugged to the iGPU.

 

And FWIW, here's another video with a proper boot to Windows with the 2nd display attached to the Mac Mini. You'll notice the Windows logo showing up briefly, and then the iGPU is disabled, followed by the main display being properly driven by the eGPU.
 
Testing the single monitor setup seems to have messed something up, because I couldn't get it to boot Windows even with the 2nd display connected to the Mac Mini. I had to reboot, and then it started working again.
 
This post was modified 3 months ago

 2018 Mac Mini i7, 32GB RAM, 512GB SSD, 10Gbit ethernet
Sonnet eGFX Breakaway Box 350W with Sapphire Vega 56 Pulse


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goalque
(@goalque)
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Joined: 3 years ago
 

@adamk77 Nothing strange there, the firmware of the Mac mini turns off the iGPU when an other operating system is detected (other than macOS) and then relinquishes control to the Windows loader. I don't know if your monitor is able to use two display inputs simultaneously, behaving the same way as you would connect two separate monitors. Some displays can do that, others don't have such a "multi screen" mode.

I don't know if the internal display was warm due to the broken EFI iGPU display driver (might consume CPU resources) or because the display was closed. However, it doesn't look good as you have a distorted, flickering Windows flag on your internal display all the time. That's why I prefer apple_set_os.efi, keeping the iGPU enabled.

automate-eGPU EFIapple_set_os.efi
--
2018 13" MacBook Pro + Radeon [email protected] + Win10 1809


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adamk77
(@adamk77)
Eminent Member
Joined: 4 months ago
 
Posted by: goalque

@adamk77 Nothing strange there, the firmware of the Mac mini turns off the iGPU when an other operating system is detected (other than macOS) and then relinquishes control to the Windows loader. I don't know if your monitor is able to use two display inputs simultaneously, behaving the same way as you would connect two separate monitors. Some displays can do that, others don't have such a "multi screen" mode.

I don't know if the internal display was warm due to the broken EFI iGPU display driver (might consume CPU resources) or because the display was closed. However, it doesn't look good as you have a distorted, flickering Windows flag on your internal display all the time. That's why I prefer apple_set_os.efi, keeping the iGPU enabled.

Thanks!  That explains everything.

 2018 Mac Mini i7, 32GB RAM, 512GB SSD, 10Gbit ethernet
Sonnet eGFX Breakaway Box 350W with Sapphire Vega 56 Pulse


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adamk77
(@adamk77)
Eminent Member
Joined: 4 months ago
 

I installed the stock driver in lieu of BootCampDrivers based on @itsage's advice and went through the steps again. I was able to simplify the steps.  I edited the guide with the simplified steps.

Also, I'm not 100% sure if this is because of the PSU, but when I run a demanding game, my screen sometimes gets momentarily very dim like someone turned down the brightness way down.

It only happens in demanding games, when the fans on the GPU and the enclosure have kicked into high gear.

I think things are better when I set the GPU into a “power saving profile” inside AMD’s Wattman. I have not seen the screen dimming after I did this, but I need to test more to be sure.

My Mac Mini and the enclosure are both connected to a UPS that shows me how much power is being drawn. At idle in Windows, it’s around 80-100W. When in a game, I’ve seen it spike to 475W. It doesn’t stay there, but the fact that it spikes so high is a little too close for comfort given the relatively weak PSU of the enclosure. Though I'm sure that it's not all due to the GPU.

So I just decided to upgrade the PSU to the 650W. I was going to do it anyway in the future because I planned on flashing the Vega 56 with the Vega 64 firmware, which would definitely have made the stock PSU inadequate.

This post was modified 3 months ago

 2018 Mac Mini i7, 32GB RAM, 512GB SSD, 10Gbit ethernet
Sonnet eGFX Breakaway Box 350W with Sapphire Vega 56 Pulse


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(@brian_wallace)
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Joined: 3 days ago
 

@adamk77

I too am using the Sonnet 350Watt with a Vega 56 without any problems.  As you point out, the Sonnet box is rated for a 300 Watt card and even my Sapphire Pulse Vega 56 is only rated for 280 Watts, even with the overclock.  

Pending: Add my system information and expected eGPU configuration to my signature to give context to my posts


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