2018 15" MacBook Pro (RP560X) [8th,6C,H] + GTX 1080 Ti @ 32Gbps-TB3 (Razer Core ...
 
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2018 15" MacBook Pro (RP560X) [8th,6C,H] + GTX 1080 Ti @ 32Gbps-TB3 (Razer Core X) + Win10 [robertjfclarke]  

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robertjfclarke
(@robertjfclarke)
New Member
Joined: 2 years ago
 

Only just got this up and running, still a WIP will post more info soon.

System specs:
MacBook Pro (15-inch, 2018)
Processor: 2.9 GHz Intel Core i9-8950HK
Memory: 32 GB 2400 MHz DDR4
Graphics: Radeon Pro 560X 4096 MB
Intel UHD Graphics 630 1536 MB

 

eGPU hardware:
Razer Core X + EVGA NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti FTW3 + 0.5m Thunderbolt 3 cable

 

Hardware Pictures: 

 

Installation steps:
OSX:
Waiting for more stable patches/drivers before proceeding here.

Windows:
Installation on Windows was quite literally plug and play, after installing Windows itself via Bootcamp and installing the Apple drivers, I plugged in the EGPU. After a couple of restarts (which I assume was to install drivers/etc.) the monitors were detected without a hitch. No additional drivers or workarounds needed to get things going. Fortnite was up and running within a few minutes of me initially connecting the EGPU. Smile

 

Benchmarks
*Coming soon*

 

Comments
Fortnite was more or less unplayable due to random drops in FPS which I assume was due to CPU throttling. More investigation needed.

World's first P2P VPN marketplace:

 
2018 15" MacBook Pro (RP560X) [8th,6C,H] + GTX 1080 Ti @ 32Gbps-TB3 (Razer Core X) + Win10 [build link]  


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rvyne
(@rvyne)
Eminent Member
Joined: 3 years ago
 

do you still hot plug this?

To do: Create my signature with system and expected eGPU configuration information to give context to my posts. I have no builds.

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cdk-
 cdk-
(@cdk)
New Member
Joined: 2 years ago
 

Was your Windows eGPU setup really that straightforward? I have the 2018 i7 MBP and the same enclosure, yet I can't get Windows to recognize anything other than a charge. This has been incredibly frustrating, and 0xbb's cpu-switch causes flickering rows of pixels when attempting to use integrated.bat, so I'm out of ideas.

To do: Create my signature with system and expected eGPU configuration information to give context to my posts. I have no builds.

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citylight7777
(@citylight7777)
New Member
Joined: 4 years ago
 

I had also some random drops of FPS due to thermal throttling. I went into power settings on windows and reduced processor speed to 99% which solved the problem.  with my Macbook i9 2,9 the frequency is now locked down to 2,9 which is working without any throttling. FPS is now good and stable. When setting back to 100% throttling is back and frequency goes up to 4 and above and then throttling down to 800 (idle) now and then which leads to stuttering.

To do: Create my signature with system and expected eGPU configuration information to give context to my posts. I have no builds.

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nando4
(@nando4)
Noble Member Admin
Joined: 4 years ago
 

@citylight7777 , when you set CPU to max 99% it disables the turbo multipliers & so drops performance. Instead, consider using Throttlestop software to decrease the max multiplier until your game/app is throttle-free.  It will certainly be higher than the x29 multiplier you are being limited to now.

eGPU Setup 1.35    •    eGPU Port Bandwidth Reference Table

 
2015 15" Dell Precision 7510 (Q M1000M) [6th,4C,H] + GTX 1080 Ti @32Gbps-M2 (ADT-Link R43SG) + Win10 1803 [build link]  


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citylight7777
(@citylight7777)
New Member
Joined: 4 years ago
 

@nando4: thanks, that's a good hint. I will try that!

To do: Create my signature with system and expected eGPU configuration information to give context to my posts. I have no builds.

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nanoBit
(@nanobit)
Trusted Member
Joined: 3 years ago
 

according to the notebookcheck.com article (German, idk if an English version exists) it's ways more effective to set a power limit of 45W. The article says a software called Intel XTU is capable to do that. To make use of the boost you can specify that the 45W limit kicks in after X seconds of high CPU usage. They said 28 seconds is normal. This speeds up the CPU by about 20%. 
For 13 inch MBPs of 2018 they suggest so set the limit to 31W.

The problem is that apple just caps the CPU by temperature. This causes the extreme performance drops because the processor fires up to nearly maximum power but in the next moment it's too hot and throttled to 800 MHz. Then it's cool enough again and it boosts again and so on and so on. The cooling system is capable of cooling the CPU when it runs with it's TDP (or in case of the 13-inch MBP even a bit over the TDP) but the boost kills it. So setting a power consumption limit (or undervolting) seems to be the best solution here.

Setup: MacBook Pro 2018 15" 2.6GHz Radeon Pro 560X on macOS 10.14 & Windows 10 (Bootcamp); Sonnet eGFX Breakaway Box 350 with a Zotac GTX1080 AMP! Edition

 
2018 15" MacBook Pro (RP560X) [8th,6C,H] + GTX 1080 @ 32Gbps-TB3 (Sonnet Breakaway 350) + Win10 [build link]  


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Notorious826
(@notorious826)
Eminent Member
Joined: 2 years ago
 
Posted by: nanoBit

according to the notebookcheck.com article (German, idk if an English version exists) it's ways more effective to set a power limit of 45W. The article says a software called Intel XTU is capable to do that. To make use of the boost you can specify that the 45W limit kicks in after X seconds of high CPU usage. They said 28 seconds is normal. This speeds up the CPU by about 20%. 
For 13 inch MBPs of 2018 they suggest so set the limit to 31W.

The problem is that apple just caps the CPU by temperature. This causes the extreme performance drops because the processor fires up to nearly maximum power but in the next moment it's too hot and throttled to 800 MHz. Then it's cool enough again and it boosts again and so on and so on. The cooling system is capable of cooling the CPU when it runs with it's TDP (or in case of the 13-inch MBP even a bit over the TDP) but the boost kills it. So setting a power consumption limit (or undervolting) seems to be the best solution here.

Glad to see that lowering the voltage has become an effective solution to stop the throttling.

To do: Create my signature with system and expected eGPU configuration information to give context to my posts. I have no builds.

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nanoBit
(@nanobit)
Trusted Member
Joined: 3 years ago
 

@Notorious826 yeah, quite ironic isn't it? But they tested it and the results are above all expectations. Hope Apple will see the article and will update the thermal management via software update

Setup: MacBook Pro 2018 15" 2.6GHz Radeon Pro 560X on macOS 10.14 & Windows 10 (Bootcamp); Sonnet eGFX Breakaway Box 350 with a Zotac GTX1080 AMP! Edition

 
2018 15" MacBook Pro (RP560X) [8th,6C,H] + GTX 1080 @ 32Gbps-TB3 (Sonnet Breakaway 350) + Win10 [build link]  


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Notorious826
(@notorious826)
Eminent Member
Joined: 2 years ago
 
Posted by: nanoBit

@Notorious826 yeah, quite ironic isn't it? But they tested it and the results are above all expectations. Hope Apple will see the article and will update the thermal management via software update

@nanoBit Haha for sure. My friend was telling me he was having the same problem with his Windows Laptop he recently purchased. Surprise — It has also has the 8th Gen Intel CPU. From what he's told me, the Intel Chip gets wayyy to hot for the Laptop to handle (just like the 2018 MacBooks). As you can guess, lowering the voltage made his problems go away as well.

Edit: He has the Gigabyte Aero 15X. Thermal throtting has become an issue with those Laptops as well. Here is a of how undervolting can improve performance with that particular laptop.

Screen Shot 2018 07 21 at 1.43.27 PM

To do: Create my signature with system and expected eGPU configuration information to give context to my posts. I have no builds.

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