11th-gen Intel Tiger Lake has PCIe 4.0 ports (hint: 64Gbps-M2 eGPU possibility)
 
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11th-gen Intel Tiger Lake has PCIe 4.0 ports (hint: 64Gbps-M2 eGPU possibility)  

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nando4
(@nando4)
Noble Member Admin
Joined: 4 years ago
 

Intel’s Tiger Lake 11th Gen Core i7-1185G7 Review and Deep Dive: Baskin’ for the Exotic tells us:

On storage: Tiger Lake technically supports PCIe 4.0 x4 from the processor. This can be used for a GPU or SSD, but Intel sees it mostly for fast storage.

This being an upgrade from the previous 6th-10th gen CPUs PCIe 3.0 PCIe ports. So adding a PCIe 4.0 eGPU like a AMD RX 5700 XT or NVidia RTX 3080 to a 11th-gen Intel CPU's x4 4.0 NVME M.2 port would see 64Gbps eGPU bandwidth.

Worth noting too that while competing Ryzen 4000 mobile CPUs like the 4800U or 4800H give outstanding CPU performance, their PCIe ports are still limited to PCIe 3.0.

It remains to be seen whether the ADT-Link R43SG/R43S eGPU adapters used in such a configuration can reliably transmit PCIe 4.0.

As Thunderbolt 3 uses 4 lanes of PCIe input, this was a golden opportunity for Intel to double Thunderbolt 4 throughput.

eGPU Setup 1.35    •    eGPU Port Bandwidth Reference Table

 
2015 15" Dell Precision 7510 (Q M1000M) [6th,4C,H] + GTX 1080 Ti @32Gbps-M2 (ADT-Link R43SG) + Win10 1803 [build link]  


Janver Codilan, tilchev, mr.ribeiro and 2 people liked
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joevt
(@joevt)
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Joined: 3 years ago
 

@nando4, Thunderbolt 3 is already running 20.625 Gbps per lane (40 Gbps but only allows ~22 Gbps for PCIe). And it's been doing that since late 2015. That's still faster then PCIe 4.0's 16 GT/s which has only recently started appearing in consumer desktops (it was started in 2011 with final release in 2017). You're asking Intel to add more Thunderbolt lanes which would require a new connector - for this there is OCulink (31.5 Gbps) and Oculink-2 (63 Gbps). Or they can increase the link rate. 40 Gbps would be extreme - PCIe 5.0 is only 32 GT/s (created 2017, final release 2019).

Anyway, as we've seen with Intel's Ice Lake 10th Gen CPU, an integrated Thunderbolt controller does not depend on the version of PCIe supported since there's no real PCIe between the CPU and the integrated Thunderbolt controller.

ADT Link does have a PCIe gen 4 product but it appears to use different cabling than their usual products:
http://www.adt.link/product/G402-3.html

 

Mac mini (2018), Mac Pro (Early 2008), MacBook Pro (Retina, 15-inch, Mid 2015), GA-Z170X-Gaming 7, Sapphire Pulse Radeon RX 580 8GB GDDR5, Sonnet Echo Express III-D, Trebleet Thunderbolt 3 to NVMe M.2 case


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Sabri Abdou
(@sabri_abdou)
New Member
Joined: 1 month ago
 

Hello! 

I am new here 

I am planning on using a gen 4 pcie laptop soI would like to know if using an r432sg in a gen4 pcie would make a difference over gen3 

To do: Create my signature with system and expected eGPU configuration information to give context to my posts. I have no builds.

.

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joevt
(@joevt)
Noble Member
Joined: 3 years ago
 

@sabri_abdou, there is a slight difference (10% on average for 1080p, down to 7% for 4K - it depends on the game). Compare PCIe x16 2.0 (similar to PCIe x4 4.0) with PCIe x16 1.1 (similar to PCIe x4 3.0) in the following article:
https://www.techpowerup.com/review/nvidia-geforce-rtx-3080-pci-express-scaling/27.html

It remains to be seen whether the R43SG is capable of 16 GT/s instead of the usual 8 GT/s. Other solutions might be better quality (they specify support for gen 4).
https://www.serialcables.com/product-category/pcie4-oculink-cables/

 

Mac mini (2018), Mac Pro (Early 2008), MacBook Pro (Retina, 15-inch, Mid 2015), GA-Z170X-Gaming 7, Sapphire Pulse Radeon RX 580 8GB GDDR5, Sonnet Echo Express III-D, Trebleet Thunderbolt 3 to NVMe M.2 case


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