mid-2012 11" Macbook Air + [email protected] (AKiTiO Node via TB3 to TB2 adapter) + Win10 [Fred.]^ // PERST# delay use may apply to other Macbooks  

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Fred.
(@fred)
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June 23, 2017 2:12 pm  

I made a little Howto / tutorial about how I got my AkiTiO Node with 1080 ti to work (after a lot of trial and error) on my Macbook Air mid 2012.
This might work on other Macbooks too. I hope I can help somebody with it.

  1. Make sure your AkiTiO Node firmware is 25.1 (It did not work with 23.1 for me) 25.1 should fix it.
  2. Do a Manual PERST# Delay
    I just put a little tape on pin 11 (see image in this tread) That’s it!
    https://egpu.io/forums/mac-setup/mbp-egpu-detection-issues/#post-23
  3. Disconnect ethernet cable / wifi so you don’t have internet.
  4. Install Windows 10 in UEFI mode (Requirement) (I used B1703 Creators Update) I did it without bootcamp (on external HD) and installed the bootcamp drivers later. (in step 7)
    You might want to google how to install Windows 10 in UEFI mode.
    https://www.google.com/#q=Install+Windows+10+in+UEFI+mode
  5. After the installation you have to stop windows from automatically installing the Intel HD 4000 driver because it's pushing a driver that doesn't work on UEFI.
    Find the GPU in device manager (Probably VGAsomeOtherText) enable the service, copy the keys, past them, delete the device from device manager and reboot.
    https://www.howtogeek.com/263851/how-to-prevent-windows-from-automatically-updating-specific-drivers/
  6. Find the correct bootcamp driver package and Install all drivers EXEPT the Intel HD 4000 Graphics driver. (You will get a black screen if you do and you have to install Windows again to fix it!) So DO NOT install that driver, delete it from the package.
    I found the bootcamp drivers for MacBook Air Mid 2012 here  https://support.apple.com/kb/DL1720?locale=en_US
    Make sure thunderbolt is working. (You should see 2 GPU's in device manager) Don't worry about the name, next step will correct that.
  7. Download the Windows 10 driver for your external GPU, Install it and reboot. Windows will boot perfectly with your eGPU.

mid-2012 11" Macbook Air + [email protected] (AKiTiO Node via TB3 to TB2 adapter) + Win10


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nando4
(@nando4)
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June 23, 2017 8:25 pm  

Thank you for this pioneering post of using a TB3 enclosure on a mid-2012 MBA.

For other readers of this thread, I'll add that a UEFI Win10 installation was suggested during offline comms as perhaps a method to overcome eGPU detection issues. Turns out that applying the 23.1-> 25.1 Node firmware was the key there.

Fred has indicated in offline comms he is happy with the current Win10 installation and won't be doing another after doing it numerous times. Meaning we don't know for sure if the UEFI Win10 installation was strictly necessary. If it wasn't then may have just added the HD4000 driver complexity issue to the mix.

Any other takers may wish to investigate if the UEFI Win10 installation was necessary and report so can have a best practices guide.

eGPU Setup 1.35    •    eGPU Port Bandwidth Reference Table    •    Several builds
2015 15" Dell Precision 7510 M1000M + macOS 10.14 & Win10


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Fred.
(@fred)
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June 23, 2017 8:37 pm  
Posted by: nando4

Thank you for this pioneering post of using a TB3 enclosure on a mid-2012 MBA.

For other readers of this thread, I'll add that a UEFI Win10 installation was suggested during offline comms as perhaps a method to overcome eGPU detection issues. Turns out that applying the 23.1-> 25.1 Node firmware was the key there.

Fred has indicated in offline comms he is happy with the current Win10 installation and won't be doing another after doing it numerous times. Meaning we don't know for sure if the UEFI Win10 installation was strictly necessary. If it wasn't then may have just added the HD4000 driver complexity issue to the mix.

Any other takers may wish to investigate if the UEFI Win10 installation was necessary and report so can have a best practices guide.

No problem 🙂
Yes, FW update was likely the solution.

I'm a quite busy at the moment but I will try a MBR Windows 10 installation next week. If there are no other issues this could make the process way easier. No messing with drivers.
I will let you guys know how it goes here.

mid-2012 11" Macbook Air + [email protected] (AKiTiO Node via TB3 to TB2 adapter) + Win10


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Fred.
(@fred)
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June 24, 2017 5:31 pm  

Ok, I tried with a Windows 10 MBR (Master Boot Record) Installation and I can confirm it's not working. So UEFI is required.
With MBR the screen goes black instantly after you select the boot disk if the eGPU is connected.
So just follow the first post and you will get it to work.
It seems like the Macbook Pro 2012 13" has the same problem. So this might be the solution for that one too.
But I can't test this because I don't own one.

mid-2012 11" Macbook Air + [email protected] (AKiTiO Node via TB3 to TB2 adapter) + Win10


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pickettd
(@pickettd)
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March 26, 2018 7:38 am  

I finally got my AORUS Gaming Box 1080 working today in Windows 10 with my mid-2012 Macbook Air. I have Sierra 10.12.6 on the Mac side. I followed the steps above that Fred posted to get it to work. I have a couple additional notes for anyone else that is interested in this type of setup:

  1. I got the egpu displaying on an external monitor pretty easily with a MBR/Legacy/Default Bootcamp install - HOWEVER I was plagued with error 12 and couldn't fix it so I started pursuing the EFI Windows path.
  2. With the AORUS box I didn't have to do PERST# Delay
  3. You can't use the Bootcamp installer to create the EFI Windows install USB, it seems like it has to be made from a Microsoft ISO (or what I did was to use the media creator tool from Microsoft on a Windows machine) - the bootcamp version would always automatically install the Intel graphics drivers (I guess) so I'd end up with a blackscreen and had to reinstall Windows. Oh and I just used the latest version of Windows as of this post (1709 I think).
  4. I pretty much used the instructions from here to do the EFI install (except that I used the Microsoft Install Media tool from here instead of unetbootin). Note that it was NECESSARY to do the gpt fdisk step)
  5. When you install Windows you should pick the Pro version so that it is possible to use the Group Policy editor to prevent the Intel graphics driver from installing (as Fred linked to) because GPEdit is not available in Home versions of Windows.
  6. Also what I did was to skip the network/wifi setup during the install of Windows - then that gave me the chance to make sure GPEdit would prevent the Intel graphics driver from being upgraded.
  7. Fred mentions that you should delete the Intel graphics installer from the Bootcamp installer package before you run it - I just wanted to highlight that you need to download the Bootcamp Assistant installer, unzip it, go into the drivers folders, the Intel subfolder, and delete the graphics installer (it is just one file I think).
  8. After the Bootcamp assistant setup was done, the computer restarted, I shut it down, plugged in the egpu, restarted, then Windows automatically installed Geforce drivers, and it had me restart one more time before everything was working (I didn't specifically have to install any Thunderbolt drivers or software).

Good luck! Hopefully you don't have to reinstall Windows a dozen times like I did 🙂


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