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[GUIDE] Quiet fan replacement for AORUS Gaming Box GTX 1080/1070
 

[GUIDE] Quiet fan replacement for AORUS Gaming Box GTX 1080/1070  

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(@derdings)
Active Member
Joined: 2 years ago
 

Hey,
at first you should check the specs of the original fans. I can’t say wether they are equal the 1070/1080 box or not. Then look at that specs and search for similar fans. That’s what I did and I found the two described.

Because I wanted it to be as quiet as possible I chose a setup as close to the original as possible and as quiet as possible. That’s it.

Noise is measurable but it’s also a subjective term. If you are not going crazy with the 27 dBA fans you are good with them but it’s nothing I can handle for hours.
You can always choose higher CFM ratings (have a look at the power consumption) but maybe it’s too much sometimes.

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Arzen
(@arzen)
Active Member
Joined: 2 years ago
 

The side and PSU fans are the same. I think the loudest fan is the PSU fan -- the stock one gets pretty loud right now after a few hours.

How are you liking your setup? I was mostly curious about that. 🙂

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(@derdings)
Active Member
Joined: 2 years ago
 

The PSU fan is a beast. Because of some struggle with the fan controller I decided to change all fans.
My wife shut down the display at her MacBook Pro and the box was still connected. In the middle of the night the controller gone crazy and the fan was running at full speed. Maybe because of charging the MacBook. It was so loud I noticed them while wearing headphones in my room. The laptop was in the living room. After swapping the fans I tested them and I had to check twice if they were running or not. I didn’t hear anything (the PSU was cold). Under load it’s a totally new device. Same temps and nearly no noise. You can hear the box at high temps but it’s no (subjective) noise anymore.
Beacause of a good offer I got for the box it’s worth the work at the fans.

Pending: Add my system information and expected eGPU configuration to my signature to give context to my posts


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Arzen
(@arzen)
Active Member
Joined: 2 years ago
 
Posted by: DerDings

My wife shut down the display at her MacBook Pro and the box was still connected. In the middle of the night the controller gone crazy and the fan was running at full speed. Maybe because of charging the MacBook. It was so loud I noticed them while wearing headphones in my room. The laptop was in the living room. After swapping the fans I tested them and I had to check twice if they were running or not. I didn’t hear anything (the PSU was cold). Under load it’s a totally new device. Same temps and nearly no noise. You can hear the box at high temps but it’s no (subjective) noise anymore.

This is almost exactly what happened to me. It motivated me to start looking into replacing the fans. Thank you for your sharing your story.

I have some more questions for you, if you don't mind...

  1. What do you think about just replacing the ("beast") PSU fan and leaving the side fans alone?
  2. Do you think it was worth terminating/crimping the cables instead of splicing them to the existing connectors?
  3. Where did you source your JST PH 2.0mm 2-pin connectors? 
  4. Lastly, would you share pictures of your setup? I'd really like to see it. 

Thank you, @DerDings!

Pending: Add my system information and expected eGPU configuration to my signature to give context to my posts


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(@derdings)
Active Member
Joined: 2 years ago
 
Posted by: Arzen
Posted by: DerDings

My wife shut down the display at her MacBook Pro and the box was still connected. In the middle of the night the controller gone crazy and the fan was running at full speed. Maybe because of charging the MacBook. It was so loud I noticed them while wearing headphones in my room. The laptop was in the living room. After swapping the fans I tested them and I had to check twice if they were running or not. I didn’t hear anything (the PSU was cold). Under load it’s a totally new device. Same temps and nearly no noise. You can hear the box at high temps but it’s no (subjective) noise anymore.

This is almost exactly what happened to me. It motivated me to start looking into replacing the fans. Thank you for your sharing your story.

I have some more questions for you, if you don't mind...

  1. What do you think about just replacing the ("beast") PSU fan and leaving the side fans alone?
  2. Do you think it was worth terminating/crimping the cables instead of splicing them to the existing connectors?
  3. Where did you source your JST PH 2.0mm 2-pin connectors? 
  4. Lastly, would you share pictures of your setup? I'd really like to see it. 

Thank you, @DerDings!

Hey @arzen, just ask whatever you want to know.
1. I think this will be the most noticeable effect.
2. I crimped all my PSU cables in my desktop. Because of this I got every tool needed at home. If you need to buy the crimping tool just for your Box don't do it.
3. www.reichelt.de fans , terminals and connectors.
4. I forgot to take pics while the box was disassembled. If you need to know or see something special feel free to ask.

I hope I can help you and all the others who are going crazy about this starting jet engine 😉

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Arzen
(@arzen)
Active Member
Joined: 2 years ago
 

What screws did you end up using? The stock fan's mounting holes are 3.5mm and the Sunon fans are using 4.3mm holes.

Thanks!

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(@derdings)
Active Member
Joined: 2 years ago
 

For the side fans the stock screws and for the PSU fan none. The PSU fan fits tight and is at least secured by the 2 screws coming from the outside of the box. I’m already looking for the right screws but it’s difficult.

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Cain_enD
(@cain_end)
New Member
Joined: 2 years ago
 
Posted by: DerDings

Hey guys,

I recently swapped the fans. 
I used:
2 x SUNON HA40101V4 4500 RPM, 5.3 CFM (9 m3/h) @ 18.2 dB
and 
1 x SUNON MB40201VX 8200 RPM, 10.8 CFM (18 m3/h) @ 27.5 dB

Building:
I crimped the JST PH connectors and it’s a pain in the a** to do it with 2 wires parallel but it is possible. Be patient and leave the wire a little bit longer as needed. Maybe you need to cut off the connector and try again.

Inserting the fans is fairly simple. The PSU fan mounting holes are bigger than the originals. Because I had no (don’t know the English word: Senkkopfschraube) proper screws at home I left the fan unscrewed. It fits tight and I think it will work at first.

Temps and noise:
To be continued. The MacBook Pro is studying outside at the moment and will be back at weekends. I try everything later and keep the post updated.

So what's your verdict??? Is it quiet???

HP Spectre x360 13 8550U/16GB + Aorus GB 1080 (32Gbps)


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Arzen
(@arzen)
Active Member
Joined: 2 years ago
 

Mine is not yet quiet enough -- 2x20.6dBA in the front, 27dBA in the PSU. You can easily hear it when you walk into the room, even when it isn't under load. It is probably about half the sound of the original fans though...

I ordered some Sunon HA series fans that should be here today. I'll test again after I have those installed.

Pending: Add my system information and expected eGPU configuration to my signature to give context to my posts


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steve500
(@steve500)
Eminent Member
Joined: 1 year ago
 

Awesome writeup.

I am trying to do a vega 56 nano build out of one of these aorus boxes and keep running into crashing issues when pushing the card really hard for a few minutes at its most strained and making the most PWM coil whine. I have already tested this card in another 600W desktop machine in the same tests and cannot get it to crash.

When testing the egpu, the draw at the wall doesn't budge 170-180watts during the stress tests, I cannot imagine that I am overloading the 450w psu.

I thought that maybe the card is experiencing some voltage ripple that it doesn't like and that maybe splitting the 12v rails in two and adding a second 6+2 pcie cable to the psu might help. I accomplished that by finding out that the 12v1 and 12v2 buses are bridged in parallel internally. I cut the bridge and added soldered in my 2nd pcie 6+2 connector. Beautiful.

Tried again,.. same results.

Figuring the PSU may be overheating, although it isn't even getting a chance to get hot to the touch before the failure happens, I added some fans. I strapped an 80mm to the inlet of the psu and tested. It ran far longer this way with no crashes. I was eventually able to get it to crash and halt. I inspected the egpu again looking at anything else I could try. I added a fan on top blowing downward between the psu and GPU, the backside of the vega56 cooks pretty warm.  I ran my same 100% load stress tests overnight last night and I cannot get it to crash now.

I am unsure if it is a PSU problem or a GPU problem. Either way, assisting air flow between the GPU and PSU made it rock solid, I'll test again tonight.

The crash state I am experiencing is sudden GPU power  loss (GPU fan stops), two chassis fans stop, RGB leds shut off, although the eGPU PSU fan continues to run and supplies voltage through the thunderbolt cable. I have to do a complete unplug and wait, reapply power to get it to come back on again.

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Siberstorm27
(@siberstorm27)
New Member
Joined: 1 year ago
 

I got a scythe SY124020L for the power supply and spent ages trying to figure out what was wrong when it didn't spin. Turns out the 5v the fan gets from the power supply isn't enough to make it start spinning. Tried playing a game for 15 minutes while checking the voltage. Still 5v. I know it should be able to go higher because the original fan gets quite annoying when gaming. I connected it to the fan connector for the side fans and it started spinning. The connector provides 7v. 

I was thinking A, I can leave it in and hope it will turn on when the power supply really needs it  or B, just get another fan, one that can actually start a 5v.

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steve500
(@steve500)
Eminent Member
Joined: 1 year ago
 
Posted by: Siberstorm27

I got a scythe SY124020L for the power supply and spent ages trying to figure out what was wrong when it didn't spin. Turns out the 5v the fan gets from the power supply isn't enough to make it start spinning. Tried playing a game for 15 minutes while checking the voltage. Still 5v. I know it should be able to go higher because the original fan gets quite annoying when gaming. I connected it to the fan connector for the side fans and it started spinning. The connector provides 7v. 

I was thinking A, I can leave it in and hope it will turn on when the power supply really needs it  or B, just get another fan, one that can actually start a 5v.

I have torn into the factory PSU to find the same thing with mine. No matter how warm this PSU gets, the variable fan speed header doesn't ever seem to budge past 5v. Odd.

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Siberstorm27
(@siberstorm27)
New Member
Joined: 1 year ago
 

Mine was opened up and it was a bit chilly in my room so don't know if that contributed or not. It was fanless while I was testing it because the fan didn't spin at 5v so didn't want to test any longer than 15min for fear of overheating something. Do these have any automatic kill switches for high temps? Wonder if I could just run it fanless.

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Siberstorm27
(@siberstorm27)
New Member
Joined: 1 year ago
 

I have a laptop cooler on its side blowing at the egpu. It's powered over usb. However, even when the egpu turns off (excluding the always on psu fan) the laptop cooler is still receiving power and doesn't turn off.

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The_Livy
(@the_livy)
Eminent Member
Joined: 1 year ago
 

No clue if this thread is still a thing but here is what i used:

For the PSU i got a Sunon EB40201S2-999 which is rated 21dBA at 6200RPM and 7.6 cfm.
As case fans i got myself 2 Sunon MF40101V2-G99-A rated 20.6dBA with 6.96 cfm.

I resoldered all the cables from the original fans and used those for the new ones (since i didn't have those connectors and figured it would be the easiest in order to get the correct cable lengths) - if you plan to do the same, pay attention not to use a too hot soldering iron for the case fans, the insulation is very heat sensitive!
Since the case fans still got quite loud due to the design flaw on the mount (the air is being pressed against the metal frame that holds the fans, since the hole is significantly smaller than the fan) I first thought about getting a heat depending resistor to regulate the fans. Since that would have required me to wait for the resistor to arrive (and get some workaround for the connector) I thought about "why not use one of the temperature controlled fans that are already in the box?" - the graphics cards fan wouldn't work, since it's PWM controlled, and the case fans I got aren't, so I simply took the original cable of the new PSU fan and connected the case fans to the PSU fan connector. Now the fans only spin up when the PSU fan spins up (which works perfectly with GPU load). My Aorus box is super silent in Idle now, without external fans and doesn't get too hot and also does not throttle due to temperature.

How to undervolt your GPU

2017 13-inch MacBook Pro TB
Aorus Gaming Box 1070 (EVGA GTX1060 3G) - silent mod #1
Aorus Gaming Box 1080 (standing by for use) - silent mod #2 (TBD)


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The_Livy
(@the_livy)
Eminent Member
Joined: 1 year ago
 
Posted by: harshw

I might be wrong, but it looks like the external fan pulls air away from the box? You might not want to do that, since the PSU pulls air in on that side and pushes it out in the back! if you really want to help your PSU with that external fan, you should have it push air towards the box!

How to undervolt your GPU

2017 13-inch MacBook Pro TB
Aorus Gaming Box 1070 (EVGA GTX1060 3G) - silent mod #1
Aorus Gaming Box 1080 (standing by for use) - silent mod #2 (TBD)


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clegg
(@clegg)
Active Member
Joined: 1 year ago
 

I did this mod and a few more other things to my Gaming box and its nothing but a sound of some moving air now, no louder than my X360 when its browing the web and running the fan 🙂    I am not new to the DIY scene, and used to run a high end computer cooling website back in the 2000's and focused heavily on efficient cooling on things for a decade.   So this was right up my alley.

Using the tips and model numbers in this thread (thanks!) I ordered the same Sunon Mag-Lev model fan for the PSU, but used the Notura ultra quiet fans up front, a 10 and 20mm models,   I used the universal connector "beans" to splice everything together and bought a pack of the JS connectors for it off of Amazon. 

Opening up the PSU vent:




I removed all the fan grates off the PSU area.  I was looking at it, and the fan back there couldn't get almost any air out.  So using some flush cutters I removed all the fan grates in the way, this will let the lower power and quieter fan work more efficiently.  Heck, you could almost go to a Notura 20mm deep fan since it can breathe so much easier now.  

Mounting the Notura fans up front were easy.  To get the 20mm deep fan mounted all I did was use some 3mm machine screws I had that were about 5mm long or less on the hole nearest the mount. 

The 20mm deep versions of fans generally don't move more CFM of air, but have a higher static pressure so they move the same air with more force and can get it through the fan grates easier. 


Running Xcom 2 (game I am kinda into right now) at 3440x1440 on an ultra wide monitor at the highest settings with the 1070 in the case - the GPU temp didn't go much above 72C and was very stable.   It makes some noise when gaming, but... I expect it to.  At Idle and just charging the laptop and doing normal desktop things its pretty quiet.

Figured I would contribute with this, since I have a ton of other questions about the quirks of this whole eGPU deal I am going to need answered coming up 🙂

Joe "Clegg"

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clegg
(@clegg)
Active Member
Joined: 1 year ago
 

After a handful of days working with the new and improved Gaming box,  I am super happy.  Virtually no noise when doing desktop things, and the noise under load while gaming is quieter than my ultrabooks CPU fan. 

Turned out to be a great tweak to the box and I canceled an order for a TB3 hub I was going to use most of the time and only use the eGPU when I was doing intensive things like gaming or photo work.

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simonfriis
(@simonfriis)
New Member
Joined: 12 months ago
 

Thanks for the helpful guide and input throughout the thread!

I wanted to replace the fans to reduce the noise and have done so with some help from a friend, using the following fans:
PSU fan: Noctua NF-A4x20 FLX (9.4 CFM - specs here)
Upper case fan: Scythe Mini Kaze Ultra 40x20 (4.86 CFM - specs here)
Lower case fan: Scythe Mini Kaze 40x10 (4.11 CF - specs here)

The new fans have been soldered to the existing connectors. The PSU fan was 3-pin, and I've simply cut off the yellow wire as there's no temp controller anyway. 

I've done a few short tests after assembling, and have found that my PSU fan does not run at all while the upper case fan doesn't start but does run if I give it a little push. My friend says the reason the upper case fan won't start on its own must be that it's not getting enough juice, while the PSU fan probably doesn't start until it's necessary, and that it probably will start running under heavy load. 

So I fired up a benchmarking tool (after helping the top case fan to a start and paying attention to the heat on the PSU) and found that the PSU fan started to make a little movement, but couldn't quite get going - see this video. Like with the top case fan I tried giving it a push, and it started running without issue until I turned off the box a little later. 

I assume both of these fans are supposed to be running all the time? Or is my friend correct that the PSU fan will not run until it's necessary - and if that's the case, how does it know when its necessary? I hope someone can help out. Thanks in advance!

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Buttons
(@buttons)
Active Member
Joined: 12 months ago
 

@simonfriis 

FYI the Noctua PSU fan airflow figure you quote is actually not in CFM but in m^3/h -- a quick conversion puts the CFM figure at ~5.5 CFM. You might want to run some heavy testing when you get it working to make sure you don't have any stability issues on load 🙂

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simonfriis
(@simonfriis)
New Member
Joined: 12 months ago
 

@buttons Thanks for the heads up! All the shops that had the fan had it listed as CFM and I didn't think to check Noctua's own specifications. I've ordered a Sunon EB40201S2-999 which I can see @the_livy has had success with and will replace the Noctua with that. 

I'm still a little perplexed about the Scythe Mini Kaze Ultra not starting when the Scythe Mini Kaze does. Have not been able to find anything about operational/starting voltage on either of the two.

This post was modified 12 months ago

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TechTradie
(@techtradie)
New Member
Joined: 12 months ago
 

I have not long come across this thread looking to make my Gaming box quieter. My use case is a little different as I need as quiet as possible as it will be used in my little music production room. I have had a good look over the thing and think I have found a way to drop the fan noises to below 15dB, parts to do so are on order. I will post an update with the results in a few days.

Basically, the idea is to place a larger power supply fan in a different spot and just remove the stock fan completely. I noticed that the power supply has plastic sheeting inside that makes it so it only draws air in from the side of the unit, even having the foam surrounding the inlet on the power supply case to help seal against the main case a bit. This vent just happens to be just under 60mm across, so the plan is to mount a 60mm Noctua fan here, even with the Ultra Low Noise Adapter it should provide more airflow than the stock fan while producing only 8dB. This will mean some modifications to the case, and the fan will have to be externally mounted. This won't be pretty but my Gaming box sits on a small shelf underneath my desk out of the way so I'm not fussed about looks anyway.

The other two fans will both be replaced with Noctua 40 x 20mm fans with low noise adapters as well.

Hopefully, this should drop the noise level drastically, but I will confirm once the mods are done and tested.

System76 Galgo Pro (8550U, 16gb ram, and 13" HiDipi) & Aorus Gamingbox 1070


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TechTradie
(@techtradie)
New Member
Joined: 12 months ago
 

So mods were a success, It runs a little warm under full load (tested with full load synthetic benchmark), but is stable pretty much inaudible in noise level, I was actually not able to measure the noise level as the ambient noise in the room is higher than the gaming box now.

Getting it this quiet did require a few drastic modifications, including mods to the main PCB, as I mentioned in my last post, this is in a music production environment so the noise level was by far my biggest concern and it rarely gets put under much load.

I would only recommend this sort of modding to experienced modders who don't mind risking bricking their gaming box.

The intake of the power supply

The 24 pin ATX connector will interfere with the 40x20mm fan that will go in the bottom and so will have to go...

I desoldered and replaced the connector with the female end of an ATX extender cable to get it up off the motherboard and out of the way of the fan.

Both 40x20mm fans with Ultra low noise adapters fitted.

Finally, the power supply fan was removed and the 60mm fan fitted to the case using the Anti-vibration mounts that were included. The space for the old fan proved a great place to stash the ULNA and the pin connectors. Power was run along the side of the case... not pretty, but incredibly quiet.

This post was modified 11 months ago

System76 Galgo Pro (8550U, 16gb ram, and 13" HiDipi) & Aorus Gamingbox 1070


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Buttons
(@buttons)
Active Member
Joined: 12 months ago
 

@TechTradie that is brilliant! Unfortunately your photo links are broken -- would love to see your work 🙂

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TechTradie
(@techtradie)
New Member
Joined: 12 months ago
 

@Buttons Update with fixed links.

Also for those who mentioned the extra connector on the PCB, I measured some voltages and my guess is that it was for a planned power button and power LED, one pin was at 5v and another at 3.2v, both common for LEDs. There are a few places on the PCB where provisions have been made for things that aren't there, like bigger LED's.

System76 Galgo Pro (8550U, 16gb ram, and 13" HiDipi) & Aorus Gamingbox 1070


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RaikoL
(@raikol)
New Member
Joined: 11 months ago
 
Posted by: TechTradie

Both 40x20mm fans with Ultra low noise adapters fitted.

Aren't these fans facing the wrong way? I'm pretty sure they are supposed to be exhaust, not intake.

MBP 2018 + Gaming Box 1080


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TechTradie
(@techtradie)
New Member
Joined: 12 months ago
 

Normally they would be intake mounted this way, I mounted this way to make running cables easier. Then reversed the polarity to get them to spin the other way.

System76 Galgo Pro (8550U, 16gb ram, and 13" HiDipi) & Aorus Gamingbox 1070


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mikegleasonjr
(@mikegleasonjr)
Eminent Member
Joined: 2 years ago
 
Posted by: TechTradie

Normally they would be intake mounted this way, I mounted this way to make running cables easier. Then reversed the polarity to get them to spin the other way.

Not an expert but I think Noctua really studied their blade technology for optimum air flow and low noise, reversing them would defeat the purpose having Noctua fan besides rotation speed and rotation quality.. or am I mistaken?

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mrjessup44
(@mrjessup44)
New Member
Joined: 11 months ago
 
Posted by: clegg

I did this mod and a few more other things to my Gaming box and its nothing but a sound of some moving air now, no louder than my X360 when its browing the web and running the fan 🙂    I am not new to the DIY scene, and used to run a high end computer cooling website back in the 2000's and focused heavily on efficient cooling on things for a decade.   So this was right up my alley.

Using the tips and model numbers in this thread (thanks!) I ordered the same Sunon Mag-Lev model fan for the PSU, but used the Notura ultra quiet fans up front, a 10 and 20mm models,   I used the universal connector "beans" to splice everything together and bought a pack of the JS connectors for it off of Amazon. 

Opening up the PSU vent:




I removed all the fan grates off the PSU area.  I was looking at it, and the fan back there couldn't get almost any air out.  So using some flush cutters I removed all the fan grates in the way, this will let the lower power and quieter fan work more efficiently.  Heck, you could almost go to a Notura 20mm deep fan since it can breathe so much easier now.  

Mounting the Notura fans up front were easy.  To get the 20mm deep fan mounted all I did was use some 3mm machine screws I had that were about 5mm long or less on the hole nearest the mount. 

The 20mm deep versions of fans generally don't move more CFM of air, but have a higher static pressure so they move the same air with more force and can get it through the fan grates easier. 


Running Xcom 2 (game I am kinda into right now) at 3440x1440 on an ultra wide monitor at the highest settings with the 1070 in the case - the GPU temp didn't go much above 72C and was very stable.   It makes some noise when gaming, but... I expect it to.  At Idle and just charging the laptop and doing normal desktop things its pretty quiet.

Figured I would contribute with this, since I have a ton of other questions about the quirks of this whole eGPU deal I am going to need answered coming up 🙂

Joe "Clegg"

How quiet is this running? I have the RX 580 gaming box and thought I received a bad unit due to how loud it is, I need a nice and quiet environment for productivity. I am sure I can do this fan mod but want to make sure its worth it as I'm considering getting another egpu box but want to try and make this one work as it would be easy to bring to college and back home.

This post was modified 10 months ago

MacBook Pro (15-inch, 2018) 2.7 ghz 6 core i7, 560X
eGPU: Gigabyte Gaming Box RX 580


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Armands Lazdiņš
(@armands_lazdins)
New Member
Joined: 10 months ago
 
Posted by: The_Livy

No clue if this thread is still a thing but here is what i used:

For the PSU i got a Sunon EB40201S2-999 which is rated 21dBA at 6200RPM and 7.6 cfm.
As case fans i got myself 2 Sunon MF40101V2-G99-A rated 20.6dBA with 6.96 cfm.

I resoldered all the cables from the original fans and used those for the new ones (since i didn't have those connectors and figured it would be the easiest in order to get the correct cable lengths) - if you plan to do the same, pay attention not to use a too hot soldering iron for the case fans, the insulation is very heat sensitive!
Since the case fans still got quite loud due to the design flaw on the mount (the air is being pressed against the metal frame that holds the fans, since the hole is significantly smaller than the fan) I first thought about getting a heat depending resistor to regulate the fans. Since that would have required me to wait for the resistor to arrive (and get some workaround for the connector) I thought about "why not use one of the temperature controlled fans that are already in the box?" - the graphics cards fan wouldn't work, since it's PWM controlled, and the case fans I got aren't, so I simply took the original cable of the new PSU fan and connected the case fans to the PSU fan connector. Now the fans only spin up when the PSU fan spins up (which works perfectly with GPU load). My Aorus box is super silent in Idle now, without external fans and doesn't get too hot and also does not throttle due to temperature.

@the_livy This is an interesting mod, care to share how it's been holding up these last months? Is see that total amperage for these fans are 0.17A, couldn't find any specification for max current for a single header, but I believe it's way above what these fans are requiring. Idea of this box being silent while doing everyday tasks is very appealing.

How often are these fans spinning up to noticeable levels? I would like to drive 4k display with it, mostly GPU non-intensive tasks.

This post was modified 10 months ago

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The_Livy
(@the_livy)
Eminent Member
Joined: 1 year ago
 


Posted by: Armands Lazdiņš

@the_livy
 This is an interesting mod, care to share how it's been holding up these last months? Is see that total amperage for these fans are 0.17A, couldn't find any specification for max current for a single header, but I believe it's way above what these fans are requiring. Idea of this box being silent while doing everyday tasks is very appealing.

How often are these fans spinning up to noticeable levels? I would like to drive 4k display with it, mostly GPU non-intensive tasks.

Sorry for the late answer, haven't checked in here in quite a while.

So far I haven't had any problems at all with my selection of fans. They really only "spin up" when the PSU gets a little load. The PSU fan I got there is (as suggested by the specs) the loudest of them and also the most audible one; I wouldn't say it's annoying, but if you concentrate on it, it can become recognizable! I'm usually playing games on the card and usually run it limited to about 85% Power Limit set with MSI Afterburner (and set to run on boot); i also changed the GPU fan curve in order to have the fan spin up at 35° with 14% (in order to reduce heat that's accumulated within the eGPU case; keeping the GPU fan at the lowest rate helps doing so without adding up to volume). Amongst what I played, I never had any issues with temperature on neither the GPU nor seemed to ever have reduced power output by the PSU, so i would consider the mod to be successful; however, like I said, I usually don't run the card at 100% since a reduction of about 15% in power limits only leads to a reduced performance of about 3-4% which is clearly worth the trade for reduced component wear and reduced overall volume.
To answer the other two questions: the fans almost only spin up when there is medium to high load on the GPU. Sometimes they will come up higher when my laptop draws more power over a longer period of time. Apart from that, I don't have the numbers in my head right now, but yes, the Sunon case fans do have lower current requirements than the standard ones, but that doesn't really matter, the only thing that matters is the voltage; the currency is basically just there for telling how much draw can be expected in order to choose the correct cables; since the fans I chose had lower currency ratings than the original ones, I therefore didn't have to care about changing anything here and also automatically knew that they will be able to run at least as good as the original ones; however, like in my first post, I noticed the too high and quite solid voltage on the case fan connectors; which is why I went with the 2-Pin connector of the PSU in order to get temperature controlled case fans (since GPU load automatically means higher PSU load and therefore an increase in PSU temperature, it was easy to just go with this); the only thing that worried me at first was the fact that the fans couldn't get back to 100% anymore as they could before (sometimes the stock fans would go even louder than in idle) - but, almost 4 months later: no problems at all; GPU temps max out at around 75°C with my fan curve and the PSU doesn't seem to be dying either (I guess that's why they chose to go with a 450W instead of a sufficient 350W PSU after all) - so, I can definitely recommend the fans I picked to anyone seeking for a less noisy box out there!

EDIT: I forgot to mention that I usually have my eGPU under my desk, using a 2m active TB3 cable in order to achieve that (laptop is on the desk in a vertical stand and closed lid, luckily boots up when it gets external power; so my power switch on the socket functions as my PC boot trigger)

ADD: Just put the eGPU next to my TV (about 3m away from my couch), it's about the same volume as the 2.5" HDD that's mounted to the back of my TV (a little less annoying though and possibly not even as loud, can't tell with 100% accuracy what is what of all that i hear)

This post was modified 10 months ago

How to undervolt your GPU

2017 13-inch MacBook Pro TB
Aorus Gaming Box 1070 (EVGA GTX1060 3G) - silent mod #1
Aorus Gaming Box 1080 (standing by for use) - silent mod #2 (TBD)


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The_Livy
(@the_livy)
Eminent Member
Joined: 1 year ago
 
Posted by: mikegleasonjr
Posted by: TechTradie

Normally they would be intake mounted this way, I mounted this way to make running cables easier. Then reversed the polarity to get them to spin the other way.

Not an expert but I think Noctua really studied their blade technology for optimum air flow and low noise, reversing them would defeat the purpose having Noctua fan besides rotation speed and rotation quality.. or am I mistaken?

Not a full expert either, but picking up some knowledge and thoughts about aerodynamics, especially airflow of propellers and such, I would clearly not recommend running with reverted polarity; instead, really try to squeeze the cables in with force and have them run correctly - this will help in both noise and airflow (in two ways, first off flow precision (turbulence and such) and second (as a result of the first) the amount of air the fans can actually transport). Besides, while I also thought about changing the PSU fan from pulling out at the back and pushing in from the side instead, I ended up with the conclusion of this not being the best idea either, due to how the rest of the case is designed. In case of the original mount, the fan will pull out hot air, while cool air will find it's own way into the PSU; changing to a push cool air might lead to an overflow and creation of just a warm pillow of air inside the PSU that might not find it's way out; the airflow isn't really frictionless in this PSU, it's really tight and there is a lot of resistance; so, please, do not change the system from pull to push entirely! maybe go for a silent pull fan and add a main push fan, but reconsider the risk of a dead PSU from heat before removing the pulling fan from the PSU!

How to undervolt your GPU

2017 13-inch MacBook Pro TB
Aorus Gaming Box 1070 (EVGA GTX1060 3G) - silent mod #1
Aorus Gaming Box 1080 (standing by for use) - silent mod #2 (TBD)


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ishikawa_goemon
(@ishikawa_goemon)
Trusted Member
Joined: 1 year ago
 

@the_livy this is a bit off topic from the fan modifications. However, do you think a re-paste of the GPU with better quality TIM or thermal pads would also help the fan noise? My thought is that it would reduce GPU temps due to more efficient heat transfer and the lower temps would result in slower fans needed to drive out the heat.

Pending: Add my system information and expected eGPU configuration to my signature to give context to my posts


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The_Livy
(@the_livy)
Eminent Member
Joined: 1 year ago
 
Posted by: ishikawa_goemon

@the_livy this is a bit off topic from the fan modifications. However, do you think a re-paste of the GPU with better quality TIM or thermal pads would also help the fan noise? My thought is that it would reduce GPU temps due to more efficient heat transfer and the lower temps would result in slower fans needed to drive out the heat.

I think that might be a little overkill, the only thing that would change by re-pasting would be how much heat is delivered to the graphics cards cooler; which doesn't mean the fans would have to do more or less at all, it just means that more heat will be carried away by the graphics cards cooler (if even noticeable); the result would be slightly less heat on the back of the card; which means that only the case fans have less to push out and also that slightly less heat is translated from the gpu to the PSU (while, depending on the efficiency of the PSU, it's not said that the PSU doesn't push out more heat over to the graphics card instead)
In other words, the only gain you get from a re-paste might be that you would need to have your graphics cards cooler to run higher since passive cooling is most likely much out of question anyway in this tight form factor with all the other heating components so close by.

ADD: I just got another idea i might give a try soon: unless you really need the performance, setting up a stable overclock offset with MSI Afterburner and a PStateLimit with NvidiaInspector might be the solution to get it down to about a GTX 1050Ti with even less heat generation while still keeping the option to go higher if necessary (i often encounter higher GPU clocks in some games for no real reason; which would run just as well on the lower clock (limiting to the lower state would limit the clock to the desired state and keep the GPU cooler in low to medium load states, where it would otherwise just clock up to maximum power and heat up more; however, I sometimes, in the past, have seen an opposing effect of limiting the pstate, where the GPU ended up getting hotter with lower clocks due to higher overall load (still couldn't come up with an answer to what exactly is going on in that scenario))) - turns out the overclock is only applied to P0 and not to any other Pstate; so that idea doesn't work as hoped; might still be a solution for games that trigger the higher pstate without requiring the extra power.

idle

Here is a screenshot of my modified fan curve and clock/power settings within MSI Afterburner; like this, the performance is basically the same as of a GTX 1060 6GB but at reduced power draw (about 30% less, i think) which is sufficient for my demands and also keeps the whole thing really quiet!

This post was modified 10 months ago

How to undervolt your GPU

2017 13-inch MacBook Pro TB
Aorus Gaming Box 1070 (EVGA GTX1060 3G) - silent mod #1
Aorus Gaming Box 1080 (standing by for use) - silent mod #2 (TBD)


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ccl13
(@ccl13)
New Member
Joined: 10 months ago
 

Would like to report that I tried a series of different 40x20 fans for the PSU, and finally settled on NMB 1608VL-04W-B40-B00.

(How do I upload a photo of the fans I tried?)

On paper, the fan has similar spec to Sunon fans. However in practice, this NMB is even quieter than the PSU's switching noise. When I first installed this model I thought the fan was dead and I had to use a piece of paper to make sure there's air flow and fan is spinning. When at full power it is also quieter than Sunon, although just a little bit.

One issue with this fan is its screw holes are smaller than stock model. You will need to bore the holes a bit so the protruding part on the PSU's shell can fit in.

This one goes for about $10 on Mouser or DigiKey. Not bad considering the much greater performance. There's also a B50 model with >10 CFM rating, I have not yet put it into my box, but will give it a try later.

Also as a lesson learned, do not put thin machine oil into the fan's ball bearing. It causes a lot of high pitched noise. I am waiting for some high quality grease to be delivered and try if I can repair one that I wasted.

This post was modified 9 months ago

2x GigaByte Gaming Box, 1070 + RX580


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EuphoricCatface
(@euphoriccatface)
New Member
Joined: 10 months ago
 

Hello! I recently got my 1070 box and looking into trying these out.
I have a question though. I don't understand why the PSU fan is configured to pull the air from inside the box. Can I try reversing the PSU fan? or maybe the thermometer is placed near the fan, ending up screwing the fan speed control?

I hope I didn't do an unnecessary post necromancy

Pending: Add my system information and expected eGPU configuration to my signature to give context to my posts


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