Razer Core X Fan Mod, PSU + Case, Buy 1 fan and (almost) silence 2
 
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Razer Core X Fan Mod, PSU + Case, Buy 1 fan and (almost) silence 2  

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AnotherEGPUser
(@anotheregpuser)
Active Member
Joined: 7 months ago
 

Hi.

 

Quick summary:

I bought a Noctua NF-A8 FLX 80mm fan to replace the PSU constant on loud fan.

https://noctua.at/en/nf-a8-flx

1A

 

This fan included 2 speed adaptors or Low-Noise Adaptors (resistors) that are made for 3-pin fans.

I used the NA-RC10 on the 120mm fan in the case (it won't start with the NA-RC12 adaptor).

https://noctua.at/en/na-src10

 

 

Result:

Now the PSU fan is dead silent, and the case fan is still audible (but a lot) lower noise than original.

The PSU fan now stops completely at the lowest speed (because of higher starting voltage than original fan) but to me this is fantastic, now the EGU is 100% silent when sleeping and won't pull dust inside when not in use.

 

Procedure:

80mm fan.

I soldered the new PSU fan to the original fan cable in the PSU.

I used the rubber adaptors for mounting, that was not needed, it is so silent.

I removed the small mesh infront of the PSU, really stupid design, to help the airflow.

 

120mm fan.

Depending on your sensitivity to sound, this exercise might not be needed at all, as with the Low Noise adaptor you get lower noise.

I'm very sensitive to noise, so I did the following:

 

The sound from this fan is caused by the electronics in the fan (the ticking sound) not by airflow.

I used a hot glue gun and filled the electronics (removed the plastic sticker on the back of fan) and also filled the inside of the fan wit hot glue...

! I do not recommend this to anyone not ready to ruin your fan !

I was prepared to ruin the fan to try to silence it, otherwise I would have bought a quiet one.

Using silicon in a small syringe is probably a lot better...

This worked well and so that silenced the fan even more.

 

 

So, with the purchase of 1 fan I silenced 2 Smile

 

Some pictures:

Original fan:

1

PSU with new fan in place:

2

PSU backside:

3

Mesh removed:

4

 

 

2013 Mac Pro (FP D300 x2) [3rd,4C,E] + RX Vega FE @ 16Gbps-TB2>TB3 (Razer Core X) + macOS 11.1 & Win10 20H2 [build link]  

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William Zheng
(@william_zheng)
New Member
Joined: 7 months ago
 

Hey, I have bought the Noctua NF-R8 Redux-1200. I wanted to know how you soldered the new Noctua fan to the original PSU fan connector.

I am not sure if reversing polarity destroys the fan or not.

Thanks!

 

EDIT: Do you think CFM

of 21,07 is enough to keep the PSU cool? I have for now attached the new PSU fan to the motherboard of the Core X. But the airflow feels less powerful, compared to the original PSU fan, which is rated at CFM: 51.43. 

This is the specification sheet of the original fan: 808025D.pdf (tsuzuki.co.jp)

This post was modified 6 months ago

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AnotherEGPUser
(@anotheregpuser)
Active Member
Joined: 7 months ago
 

@william_zheng, Hi.

 

A side note on connecting the PSU fan on the 3-pin motherboard connector:

I think there is at least 2 big problems with connecting the PSU fan to the 3-pin connector on the motherboard.

1. If the PSU gets hot, and calls for higher fan speed it doesn't get that, so the PSU might always run hot!

2. The motherboard fan turns off during sleep, if the PSU needs cooling during sleep (calling for higher fan speed) it doesn't get that so it will run hot!

 

Example:

If I run Heaven (until the PSU fan starts) and then put the computer to sleep the Motherboard fan stops directly but the PSU fan keeps going until the PSU is cooled!

If you would have connected the PSU fan to the motherboard, well then the PSU would not have the required cooling.

And if the PSU need cooling during sleep (because the GPU is always on but in sleep mode) well, then it would not get that.

 

So I my opinion, no-one should do that mod, the function of the cooling system for the PSU will effectively be broken.

 

*Edit, update just minutes after posting..

Why you should not connect the PSU fan to the motherboard header:

See post from @vrtx_void , his PSU was destroyed..

https://egpu.io/forums/postid/92751/

 

 

Now for changing the PSU fan.

The original fan has a max RPM of 3900!

If you connect that fan directly to 12V it's a storm, so I don't think anyone has heard that from their Razer Core X.

So, in my opinion, the original fan is way over-dimensioned, for regular, well ventilated rooms.

 

You will not destroy the fan if you connect the polarity wrong, it just won't start.

However, here is the polarity of the original PSU fan:

See the markings on the cable for the positive and negative voltage.

IMG 5540

 

If you change to a fan with less CFM, and remove the mesh infront of the PSU, you will have similar (or better cooling) at lower fan speed, depending on the fan.

My PSU never gets hot or warm to the touch.

 

Your fan has a lower CFM than mine, but you could just try it (+ remove mesh) and see if it works.

My guess is that it will work fine, but I don't know your GPU, ambient temp, placement of eGPU etc etc.

If you have your eGPU in a closed or poorly ventilated place, then you might need the 3900RPM of the original fan.

My guess is that Razer is covering all different usage situations, so it won't overheat, but with that comes noise.

 

 

 

2013 Mac Pro (FP D300 x2) [3rd,4C,E] + RX Vega FE @ 16Gbps-TB2>TB3 (Razer Core X) + macOS 11.1 & Win10 20H2 [build link]  

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William Zheng
(@william_zheng)
New Member
Joined: 7 months ago
 

Thanks for the reply!

I'm not exactly a fan of soldering but I'm willing to try it out. But where exactly did you solder the Noctua Fan cable to the PSU board? 

EDIT: I forgot to ask one thing about the 120MM fan.

I already bought the NF-S12B redux-700, following the advice of the other guide, which I initially read through. After connecting the 3-pins to the large board, by swapping with the original 120MM fan, the redux fan moves a little bit, but it seems to not complete the first rotation, resulting in the fan not spinning at all. Any idea why that happens? If I give the NF-S12B a little tick to the fans, it just spins normally. But that initial moment seems to not start the fan correctly.

NF-S12B redux-700 (noctua.at)

This post was modified 6 months ago

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Thomas Haas
(@thomas_haas)
New Member
Joined: 1 month ago
 

I tried the Noctua NF-R8 and NF-S12B. Neither did spin up on their own.

I then bought the Enermax T.B. Silence 80mm & 120mm. They both spin up and work fine. I didn't check to what extend the airflow is comparable to the orginial fans.

I connected the 120mm to the motherbord using the regular connector.

The 80mm PSU fan needs soldering. I cut the cable from the original 80mm PSU fan. The Enermax comes with an adapter cable, I soldered that one to the power cable and connected the new fan using the standard connector.

 

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murks
(@murks)
New Member
Joined: 2 weeks ago
 

@anotheregpuser, Thanks a lot for the posting and detailed explanation. I tried the same (or almost) but I guess I am doing something wrong.

I cut the original PSU fan cable and connected it to the 4pin Y cable (cutting off the 4pin adapter), that came with the Noctua NF-A8 FLX. It was the only of the available extra cables that came without 3 wires so I thought this makes sense. I did not solder the cables together but just twisted the wires together and then cover them with shrink tubing.

Then I connected the Noctua to the the now in theory connected power source and hoped for the best. Unfortunately hoping was not enough as the Noctua doesn't spin up at all. I tried switching the wires in case I got +/- wrong, but that didn't help either.

It would be great to get some advise on this. My last option would be soldering the Noctua directly to the PSU motherboard but I would rather only mess with the cables (and currently don't have any device for soldering). Could it be the 4pin connecter cable and instead I should cut the 3pin extension cable? Is it the fact that I didn't solder anything properly?

 

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AnotherEGPUser
(@anotheregpuser)
Active Member
Joined: 7 months ago
 

@murks, Hi!

 

If you connected the fan cables correctly the fan will not start when starting the EGPU.

The voltage is too low from the PSU in the lowest state to start the Noctua fan.

 

If the power supply gets warmer it will increase the fan speed = The voltage is now high enough to start the PSU fan.

So you will need to load the GPU with a game or a benchmark to get it started.

 

I guess you did not want to destroy the original fan connector on the fan, so you used an adapter.

The fan only need +Plus and -minus and I think you connected the fan correctly, the PSU just did not get hot enough to call for higher fan speed.

 

This can take a while, watch your temps (with the hand touch the outside of the PSU, with an open case to see that your PSU fan starts.

 

Also remove the mesh, it will not help with dust as it is on the exhaust side (really strange design) but will help airflow alot.

Most of the time my PSU fan doesn't start at all, the chassifan + removed mesh + gpu (GPU have a rear exhaust) does the job.

 

Good luck!

 

 

2013 Mac Pro (FP D300 x2) [3rd,4C,E] + RX Vega FE @ 16Gbps-TB2>TB3 (Razer Core X) + macOS 11.1 & Win10 20H2 [build link]  

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AnotherEGPUser
(@anotheregpuser)
Active Member
Joined: 7 months ago
 
Posted by: @thomas_haas

I tried the Noctua NF-R8 and NF-S12B. Neither did spin up on their own.

Hi @thomas_haas.

This is expected, the Noctua doesn't start with the lowest PSU fan voltage.

As soon as the PSU gets a little warmer the Noctua starts.

Thank for your recommendation on fans that start with the low PSU voltage as the original fan.

I can understand that this is not a wanted behaviour for some, but for me this is great.

Result:

The PSU fan now stops completely at the lowest speed (because of higher starting voltage than original fan) but to me this is fantastic, now the EGU is 100% silent when sleeping and won't pull dust inside when not in use.

Have a nice day!

This post was modified 2 weeks ago
2013 Mac Pro (FP D300 x2) [3rd,4C,E] + RX Vega FE @ 16Gbps-TB2>TB3 (Razer Core X) + macOS 11.1 & Win10 20H2 [build link]  

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murks
(@murks)
New Member
Joined: 2 weeks ago
 

@anotheregpuser, thanks a lot again for you help, and the very fast reply! I am not home at the moment but I shall try it out tomorrow. Before, I was too afraid I messed up something, so I cut the electricity to PSU right away after I saw the fan is not spinning up. The only thing that gave me peace of mind was that my laptop still recognised it as a Core X and the 120mm fan was spinning 😀 But now you made my day!

Regarding fans and directions etc: If the PSU fan is an exhaust and the GPU fan (currently RTX 2060) is an exhaust, the 120mm fan should be the one actually getting some air inside the case no? For some reason I have the feeling that it is currently also an exhaust. But then I have no clue about how the airflow should be to be honest. 

To complement your buy 1 fan and silence 2 approach: I removed the rubber pads from the Noctua on the side that is not connected to the chassis and added them to the 120mm fan. No idea if that helps reducing the noise as I haven't yet tested a lot but at least I couldn't hear anything from the 120mm fan the few seconds it was runnig. They don't fit perfectly but with a bit of cutting you can make a nice anti vibration pad where the only downside is that the screwing domes are designed to go halfway through the fan, so you might still get some vibration there.

 

To do: Create my signature with system and expected eGPU configuration information to give context to my posts. I have no builds.

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Thomas Haas
(@thomas_haas)
New Member
Joined: 1 month ago
 

@anotheregpuser

I expected the fans to spin up as soon as temperature rises. At the time I had no way to test it. I didn't know how to measure the temperature. 

Only later I found out that windows task manager shows the temperature of the graphics card :/

 

 

To do: Create my signature with system and expected eGPU configuration information to give context to my posts. I have no builds.

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