Akitio Node - Updating Firmware without Windows
 
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Akitio Node - Updating Firmware without Windows  

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highpass
(@highpass)
Eminent Member
Joined: 5 years ago
 

Has anyone managed to update their Node firmware via Parallels/WINE? I don't have access to a TB Windows box to perform the update.

To do: Create my signature with system and expected eGPU configuration information to give context to my posts. I have no builds.

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chocomonsters
(@chocomonsters)
Eminent Member
Joined: 5 years ago
 

VMware and Parallels do not support TB3.

MacBook Pro 15" 2018
MSI Ge Force RTX 2080
Akitio Node
Windows 10 20H2 / Akitio Node Lite / Samsung SSD 970 EVO


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ed_co
(@ed_co)
Reputable Member
Joined: 5 years ago
 

But with bootcamp is possible, right?

2017 15" MacBook Pro (RP560) [7th,4C,H] + GTX 1080 Ti @ 32Gbps-TB3 (Mantiz Venus) + macOS 10.13 & Win10 [build link]  

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Fred.
(@fred)
Trusted Member
Joined: 5 years ago
 

I don't want Windows on my Internal SSD so I'm going to do it this way.

Clone MacOS HD to External HD
boot MacOS from external hd
Install Windows via bootcamp on the same external hd. 
Boot into Windows on the external HD and update FW.

I'm still waiting for my AKiTiO Node, It will probably be another 2 weeks 🙁
"The beast" (1080ti) arrived already. It's hard to wait...

mid-2012 11" Macbook Air + GTX1080Ti@10Gbps (AKiTiO Node via TB3 to TB2 adapter) + Win10

 
2012 11" MacBook Air [3rd,2C,U] + GTX 1080 Ti @ 10Gbps-TB1>TB3 (AKiTiO Node) + Win10 [build link]  


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benr
 benr
(@benr)
Eminent Member
Joined: 5 years ago
 

@Fred.

For what it's worth, Fred, installing Windows 10 Pro 64bit via Boot Camp Assistant on the internal SSD was incredibly straightforward: the Assistant took care of all the partitioning and install direct from an .ISO without any issues (creating a 50GB partition for Windows). I used a Windows 10 .ISO direct from microsoft.com and then after booting into Windows installed the NUC Thunderbolt 3 drivers and ran the Akitio firmware update.

The entire process took less than an hour, including the firmware update. It wasn't even required to activate Windows to do the Akitio update. After alt-restarting to get back into macOS, I reset the Startup Disk to macOS and haven't thought about Windows being on the SSD since.

I have left the Boot Camp partition in place for now (in case I need to test or update anything further under Windows), but deleting it is just as simple: a single click with Boot Camp Assistant restores the single partition macOS.

Perhaps you've had experience with Boot Camp Assistant on external drives, or want a Windows version on a drive, but I mention this in case you're only doing it to run the firmware tool and want to save yourself the time of the cloning, etc.

To do: Create my signature with system and expected eGPU configuration information to give context to my posts. I have no builds.

.

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Fred.
(@fred)
Trusted Member
Joined: 5 years ago
 

The cloning is easy and probably the fastest part.
I don't have enough space on my internal ssd so that's the first reason I do it on an external drive. The second reason is that I don't want that on my Macbook all the time but still be able to use it when I need it. I have several usb drives lying around so it can probably stay on there. 

mid-2012 11" Macbook Air + GTX1080Ti@10Gbps (AKiTiO Node via TB3 to TB2 adapter) + Win10

 
2012 11" MacBook Air [3rd,2C,U] + GTX 1080 Ti @ 10Gbps-TB1>TB3 (AKiTiO Node) + Win10 [build link]  


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ed_co
(@ed_co)
Reputable Member
Joined: 5 years ago
 

The external HD in your case is the best option. Go for it 😉

2017 15" MacBook Pro (RP560) [7th,4C,H] + GTX 1080 Ti @ 32Gbps-TB3 (Mantiz Venus) + macOS 10.13 & Win10 [build link]  

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Fred.
(@fred)
Trusted Member
Joined: 5 years ago
 

I actually found an even better way so I don't have to install Windows Again.
And I would like to share it here.

I already have a Windows 10 VM in Parallels so I needed something to convert the VM to a bootable USB drive.
And it was actually really easy and all the software I used was free.

Steps to convert any Windows installation to a bootable USB:

1. Unless you already have a .vhd file Fist convert vm/bare metal Windows installation with Disk2vhd so you get a .vhd file.
2. Then convert the .vhd to a bootable usb with WinToUSB.
3. Done! Boot windows from usb.

And even my grandma could do this!

mid-2012 11" Macbook Air + GTX1080Ti@10Gbps (AKiTiO Node via TB3 to TB2 adapter) + Win10

 
2012 11" MacBook Air [3rd,2C,U] + GTX 1080 Ti @ 10Gbps-TB1>TB3 (AKiTiO Node) + Win10 [build link]  


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